PCB Assembly Services - Screaming Circuits: PCB DESIGN TIP OF THE DAY: CLEARLY DEFINE YOUR "KEEP OUT" ZONES

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PCB DESIGN TIP OF THE DAY: CLEARLY DEFINE YOUR "KEEP OUT" ZONES

August 10 blog post - Clearly define...

Similar to the connector issue, it’s vital that you clearly define any “keep out” zones intended for aspects such as mounting holes or sensitive circuitry. While you are defining those zones, remember that solder mask isn’t considered a reliable insulator, so take care that there is proper distance between copper and any mounting hardware.
 
The pictures above are a small sample of what our San Diego PCB's designers did for a customer. It is impossible to show every layer at one time, but you can see the "keep outs" and masking areas defined in the CAD data. There were also several pages of mechanical constraints to make sure that we did not place a part where a wall was planned. It took a lot of coordination between our PCB designers and the customer's mechanical engineer in order to get a PCB that matched up perfectly to the housing.
 
Failing to properly design and define your "keep out" zones will lead to major issues such as creating a shock hazard on your board, causing electromagnetic interference, or winding up with an un-mountable part. 
 
Need layout help?
 
Our  San Diego PCB  division specializes in PCB layout; turning your schematic into a high quality PCB layout. San Diego PCB is headquartered in San Diego, CA with offices in Phoenix, AZ and Milwaukee, WI.
 
With over 200+ years of combined experience and expertise provided on thousands of printed circuit boards, you can rest assured your PCB layout will be done correctly, on time and within budget.
 
The designers employed at San Diego are CID and/or CID+ (Certified Interconnect Designers).
 
 

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