Screaming Circuits: Our website and Process

PROTOTYPE AND SMALL VOLUME
PCB ASSEMBLY MADE EASY

Part 1, Screaming Circuits and the Maker community

Yes, a Maker can get 250 custom-design Arduino-compatible boards built for about $10.00 each at Screaming Circuits. How can Screaming Circuits, a full-service assembly provider, compete with a low-cost assembly house? Upon first thought, it might seem like Screaming Circuits,... Read more

Warped PC boards

So... You just got a nice big PC board back from the fab shop. You set one on your desk to admire only to discover that it's warped. What do you do? There are two primary types of causes of... Read more

BGAs and Package on Package

Take a look at the closeup of one of our Beagleboards here on the right. That's what package on package (POP) looks like up close. The bottom chip is a Texas Instruments OMAP processor, in BGA form with 0.4mm pitch... Read more

Panel Rails - What Are They?

I referred to "panel rails" in my blog about V-score panels, but I didn't explain the "whats" and whys" of panel rails. You might find yourself asking "what are panel rails and why would I want to use them?" Well,... Read more

Individual routed boards - not panelized

Some people, especially in the manufacturing industry, refer to PC board panels by the term "palette." I can't seem to avoid thinking of the big wooden thing used for shipping stuff, so it's tough for me to call a panel... Read more

Tab Routing panelization

In my prior post, I covered V-sore panelization. The other very common panelization method is called tab-routing, as in routed, but with tabs. (That's "routed" like using a router, not as in Napoleon being chased out of Russia.) Following this... Read more

V-Score panelization

My last post talked a bit about panelization, in general. Today, I'm taking a look at V-Score panelization. V-score is created by running a V-shaped blade across the top and bottom of the panel without cutting all the way through.... Read more

PCB Panel Routing Technique

Most PCBs we receive are individually routed, i.e., not panelized. That doesn't mean that, sometimes, sending them in a panel isn't a good idea, or required. Generally, we don't require panels (sometimes called a pallet), but there are some cases... Read more

ODB++ plus, plus, plus

I wrote a bit about ODB++ back in October. Nothing has really changed much since then. I'm just clarifying a few things. First, I want to put more emphasis on the use of ODB++. In addition to being beneficial to... Read more

Surface Mount, But Not Really

Sometimes parts labeled as surface mount aren't quite ready for prime time. I've written about this subject before (read here), and I'm going to write about it again - whether you like it or not. This time, however, I'm not... Read more