Screaming Circuits: Our website and Process


No need to waste parts

We love parts on reels. Who doesn't? But reels aren't always practical - and it's not just about cost. Cost is, of course, important, but there may be other factors to consider.

Say, for example, you need 20 2.2K Ohm, 5% 0805 resistors. You could buy a small strip of 25 from Digikey for $0.32. That gives the 20 you need, plus a few spares just in case.

Alternately, you could buy a digi-reel ( a custom quantity reel). On the reel, you'll probably want more parts to keep the strip long enough for the feeder. Let's go with 250 parts for $1.39. Digikey charges $7.00 extra to create a custom reel, so that's a total of $8.39. Still peanuts.

For a third choice, you could just buy a full reel of 5,000 for $10.64. Still peanuts. If you're gong to need the same part for a lot of designs, this might make sense. But, there's more than just cost to consider. You need to store and ship it. Shipping two dozen reels gets pretty expense. Storing and inventorying several dozen reels can become a hassle too.

Cut strips on plateThe beauty of Digikey, Mouser, and other places that sell cut strips is that they essentially become your parts warehouse. You pay the $0.32 cents and never have to worry about whether the part is in your inventory, how many are in your inventory, digging it out of wherever you stuffed the reel when you last needed it...

If you do buy and store the whole reel, you don't need to ship the entire reel to us. Just cut a strip with the number you need, plus about 10% for that "just in case" (50% extra for tiny 0201 parts).

Of course, if you need a few thousand of the parts, go ahead and send us the reel. It would make sense then.

Duane Benson
Reel, reel your part
Solder it, solder it, solder it, solder it
Cost is but a factor

Packing Parts for Personal Manufacturing

Manufacturing, especially small volume one-time-only builds (like a prototype) is hard. It's not wise for most people to actively seek out chaos, but that's what we do, and we do it wisely. That's what we've been doing since 2003. 

We do it because it's hard and because it's necessary.

A big part of quality manufacturing involves risk reduction. Prototyping and quick-turns inherently add in a lot of risk. While we've designed our processes and systems around turning that risk into a quality product, there are a few things that you, the customer, can do to help reduce risk even further.

One of the best things you can do to reduce risk is to prepare a well organized kit, as shown in this video.

 

You can send us your parts in short, cut strips, like you get from Digikey or Mouser, long continuous strips, full or partial reels, tubes or trays. We machine place from all of those types of packages. What's important is clear labeling and organization.

Individual, or mixed/loose components are not good, though. Pins get bent, leads get contaminated, values get mixed... Leave them in the strip, even if it's short. If you've got multiple short strips of the same part, we can still machine place. Don't tape them together. We can deal with them as is.

Duane Benson
Peter Piper Picked a Peck of Pickeled Manufacturing

What is Personal Manufacturing?

There's a lot of buzz floating around these days, about "Personal Manufacturing." Screaming Circuits has more than a decade of bringing personal manufacturing to engineers. We pretty much started the category in the electronics industry, so we're quite familiar - but not everyone knows what personal manufacturing is. I'll do my best to describe it, and what it can do for you.

The short answer, is that personal manufacturing is building your boards on your terms, not on the terms of some nameless, faceless factory.

Vertical_markets
The longer answer is probably more useful. 

Traditional manufacturing is all about statistics and fractions of a penny. Those factors are important; especially if you're manufacturing millions. But, when you just need a few boards, or a few hundred boards, those factors can make your job nearly impossible.

With personal manufacturing, you can decide when you want or need assembled boards on your workbench. You won't need to beg for time on a busy volume manufacturing line. In the case of Screaming Circuits, it's cloud-based manufacturing so you can order online from your desktop, when you're ready, rather than waiting for someone to pick up a telephone.

With personal manufacturing; you design it, get some prototypes, make a few mods, lather, rinse, repeat. Then, you'll get a few dozen, few hundred, or few thousand, and start selling. You'll get what your budget allows and don't need to commit to minimum volumes, or long-term business. You can polish your design faster, with less hassle, and you can get to market faster, with less hassle. Faster to market and less hassle both mean more time and money for you.

NPI (new product introduction) has never been easier than it is with personal manufacturing. Years ago, I was a product manager at a start-up. The entire NPI process was a nightmare. Our engineers couldn't get anything built without half a dozen support staff. Someone had to make the documentation usable. Someone had to hunt down sample quantities of parts. Someone had to make sure the board would fit on the volume manufacturers' assembly line. It went on and on like that, taking up months of the design cycle. We were at the mercy or people who only cared about making their part of the process easier.

Rather than producing the quality product we wanted, our new products would be shipped to customers with mod wires. I recall one board that needed 64 mod operations before it could be shipped. Yes, that was on a released, shipping product.

With personal manufacturing, as Screaming Circuits provides, you can get a few prototypes built right away. If need be, you can modify, and get a few more built at your convenience. When the mode wires are gone, you can build up a hundred and get them out to customers without delay. It's not about what works best for Screaming Circuits; it's about what works best for you.

Duane Benson
Right now a personal pan pizza delivered to my desktop would work for me.

 

 

Manufacturability Index in practice

My prior blog covered the Screaming Circuits Manufacturability Index. It's something I'll be using from time to time when discussing new components I run across. I've got a few examples to put the numbers into context.

On the low side of the index, we have:

7400 TH1: Just about anyone could hand solder the part
Examples: Thru-hole parts

The SN7400 quad NAND Gate, shown on the right, is a good example. It's big, it's thru-hole, and if someone has trouble hand soldering it, they really need a few more classes.

Closer to the other end, is a new chip I've run across. The Silego GPAK4 is a small FPGA-like mixed signal device. It's got a number of analog peripherals, a bank of programmable logic, and the ability to configure it up the way you want. Take a look at it below:

GreenPAK4 cropped

This little thing is housed in a 2 mm X 3 mm QFN package. That's pretty tiny by the standards of my giant fumble-fingers. I've given it a rating of 4.b, on the Screaming Circuits manufacturability index. The number ranking "4" means: "Needs advanced automated assembly technique", and the letter suffix "b" means: "Typical level of challenge within the number rank." In other words, right up our alley.

Unless you posses super-human abilities, and maybe lasers in your eyes, you won't be hand soldering these. You'll have them assembled by us (or someone with the same technical capabilities as us), where it will be a standard process.

If you do want to put one or more of these in your design, you will want to make (or find) a custom library footprint for your CAD software. Due to the variable length pads, a standard one-size-pad footprint might lead to solder joint reliability issues.

Duane Benson
The chips go marching one by one, hurrah, hurrah
The chips go marching one by one,
The little one stops to suck her thumb
Just to see if the solder is lead-free

 

Screaming Circuits Component Manufacturability Index

Screaming Circuits Manufacturability Index

Ranks the difficulty of assembling a component. Index is one to five, with one being easiest, and five being the most complex

Sub index: a, b, c

    a: Not a challenge within the number rank
    b: Typical level of challenge within the number rank 
    c: Fits in the ranking, but likely needs special process, fixtures or attention

1: Just about anyone could hand solder the part
Examples: Thru-hole parts

2: Surface mount. Should be machine placed, but big enough to hand solder
Examples: 0805 or larger surface mount passives, SOIC packages

3: Pretty much any grade of surface mount equipment can handle this component
Examples: TSSOP or larger, 0.8mm pitch BGAs

4: Needs advanced automated assembly techniques
Examples: 0.4mm pitch BGAs or QFNs, CSP (chip scale package) or WSP (wafer scale package) BGAs, 0201 size passives, Package on Package (POP)

5: More or less R&D at this point. Few companies have or will assemble this part
Examples: 0.3mm pitch micro BGA, 1,700+ ball BGAs, 01005 passives

Just about everything 4b, and below are routinely within Screaming Circuits standard (guaranteed) process. 4c, 5a, 5b, 5c, are becoming more common here. These are special process (falling outside of our guarantee), but we can usually do a good job with them. You'll need to speak with a manufacturing engineer before placing the order.

Duane Benson
a colossal negative space wedgie of great power coming right at us at warp speed
Readings are off the scale, captain

Component Footprint Rotation

Before we (or any old assembly house) go about putting surface mount parts on your board, we need to program our assembly robots. I'm oversimplifying, but essentially, the machine program needs to know the X / Y coordinates, relative to the board origin (which is the lower left-hand corner), the part rotation, and the side of the board.

In years past, we needed a Centroid file (AKA pick-and-place file) containing all of that information. In some cases, we still need the Centroid, but not always. Today, we can get the same information from ASCII CAD files, ODB++ CAD files or Eagle .brd files. You only need a Centroid if you send us your board files in Gerber format.

If you do send us a Centroid file, you no longer need to worry about rotation. The IPC has defined the zero degree orientation, as well as proper rotation direction, but too many part footprints set the zero degree at different angles. We can't rely on the data.

While we have to ignore rotation and figure it out with other means, we still do strongly recommend that you follow IPC standards when you make your own footprints. I've got some illustrations below, showing how footprints are supposed to be oriented.

Duane Benson
There's no earthly way of knowing
which direction we are going
There's no knowing where we're rowing

Package origins

Passives orientation r2

Chip rotation

Quad and BGA

Three-pin parts

Freescale KL03 and PCB123 at 0.4mm pitch

Small component packages seem to be a recurring theme with me. It's understandable, I guess. Super tiny packages are becoming more and more common and we build a lot of product with them.

The smallest we've built is 0.3mm pitch. Those aren't common enough to be considered standard - they're still an experimental assembly - but not many chips use them yet. 0.4mm, on the other hand, is something we see on a pretty regular basis.

What's so tough about that?

The biggest challenge with these form-factors seems to be footprint design and escape routing. I can see why. There really isn't room to follow any of the standard BGA practices. You can't fit escape vias between the pads and you can't put vias in the pads, unless they are filled and plated over at the board house. Filled and plated vias are the easiest way to go, but it can make for an expensive board fab.

KL03 WLCSP20 on a US Lincoln Penny

1-DSC_0008One of my side-projects involves trying to make the smallest possible motor driver. For this project, I've chosen the Allegro A3903 driver. It's a 3mm X 3mm DFN (dual flatpack no leads) with 0.5mm pitch pads and a thermal pad in the middle. The microcontroller will be the new Freescale KL03 32-bit ARM in a 1.6mm X 2.0mm WLCSP (wafer level chip scale) package. It also comes in a 3mm X 3mm 0.5mm pitch 16 pin QFN. Without an expensive PCB, that may be my only option.

Pick your CAD package

I'm using the newest version (5.1) of Sunstone Circuit's CAD package, PCB123, but the principles here will apply to any CAD software. If you don't already have a copy, download PCB123 V5.1 here.

If you've got fast Internet, you're done now, so go ahead and install it. You'll need the manual too, which you can get here.

I need to eat now, so stay tuned for Part 2.

Duane Benson
Nerfvana - It's like Nerdvana, but with more foam darts.

Cost Reduction in Design - More Advice for Makers

If you're looking for the absolute, cheapest possible assembly service, you'll need to look outside of North America. If you really need a decent price with good quality and good service, you can keep your gaze West of the Atlantic and East of the Pacific.

Like everything else in the modern world, design decisions can have a pretty big impact on your cost. So, lets take a look at some design decisions that can make your manufacturing more affordable.

  • Accept longer lead times

Lead times are one of the biggest factors in electronics manufacturing. Screaming Circuits can turn a kitted assembly job overnight, but it costs a lot of money to do that. Screaming Circuits also has a 20 day turn-around that is much, much more affordable. Accepting longer lead times on PCB fab will drop your cost as well.

  • Avoid leadless packages like QFNs and BGAs

We build tons of QFN and BGA boards - even down to 0.3 mm pitch micro BGAs. That's great if you need those packages. However, since all of the leads are underneath, we have to x-ray every part. That adds a bit of cost to the process. If you can, stick with TSSOPs and other parts with visible leads.

  • Use reels, or 12" or longer continuous strips

Tab routed multi panel 1024We will gladly assemble parts on strips of almost any size. But, to save costs, use full or partial reels or continuous strips of at least 12" long. It costs us less time to work with reels and continuous strips, and we pass those savings on.

  • Stick with surface mount

These days, thru-hole components tend to be hand soldered. That costs more than machine assembly, so use surface mount wherever possible. Surface mount components tend to be less expensive than thru-hole too. If you do need a few thru-hole parts, this is an opportunity to put in a little sweat equity by soldering the thru-hole yourself and save a bit of money.

  • Consider keeping your surface mount parts on one side

Putting surface mount parts on both sides of the pc board is a great way to better utilize space. However, if cost is more of a concern, and you only have a few parts to put on the back side, it may be more cost effective to move them to the top side.

If you've got a lot of parts, the additional cost for assembling both sides may be less than the cost for the extra PC board size, but with a small number of parts that's probably not the case. Quote it both ways and see which is less expensive

  • Panelize small boards

We can work with really tiny boards individually, but sticking with a larger size makes the job easier, and, again, we'll pass those saving on. If your PC board is smaller than 16 square inches, panelize it. We put in less labor and you get a price break.

By sticking with Screaming Circuits, you get the same care and quality that we give to boards going up into space, down into the ocean, and everywhere in between. By sticking with Screaming Circuits, you get a known turn-time; not an "about ..."

By following these guidelines, you get a decent price and really good quality and service.

Duane Benson
That would be telling

PART 2, SCREAMING CIRCUITS AND THE MAKER COMMUNITY

My last post mused on the affordability of assembly at Screaming Circuits for the maker/very small business/kickstarter community. My hypothetical Arduino-compatible dual motor driver Kickstarter came out to $9.81 per board at a quantity of 250. That's probably more than a cheap off-shore assembler, but we'll get you 100% yield. They probably won't.

TI TPS62601 front and backIt's more than just cost though. Many of the budget manufacturers won't do the most complex parts. For example, I could shave about a square inch off of the board size - maybe two - by using 0402 or 0201 passive parts. That's about $.50 - $.75 less per board for the blank PC board. Most discount assembly shops won't assemble 0201 parts. Many won't assemble 0402 parts. Screaming Circuits will assemble 0201s, and your little micro BGAs too!

The part on the right is a tiny wafer scale BGA next to the edge of a U.S. dime. We can build that.

If you're just designing the board and not hand assembling, putting in 0402 or 0201 parts is no big deal. You just design it and let the robots build it. If your assembly house can't deal with those small parts, you're stuck. You've lost some freedom of choice.

Now, you would expect me to be biased, because I work here, but more than bias, it's a matter of picking the right tool for the job.

If time is your key driver and cost isn't an issue, you'd want quick-turn Full-Proto; our Short-Run production would be the wrong tool.

If cost is your key driver, you have more time, you need predictability, and need good yields, our 24 hour Full-Proto service might be overkill, but our 20 day Short-Run can do all of the hard work for you, and you'd know exactly what you're getting, and when: 250 working boards in 20 days, for a decent price.

Here's a Kickstarter project we built earlier this year.

Duane Benson
Don't use a Marten64 0-dot-19 Freembulator when you really need a Model B Mitchel Warbler brand size 32.125 green Sackcombobulator.

 

Part 1, Screaming Circuits and the Maker community

Yes, a Maker can get 250 custom-design Arduino-compatible boards built for about $10.00 each at Screaming Circuits.

How can Screaming Circuits, a full-service assembly provider, compete with a low-cost assembly house?

Upon first thought, it might seem like Screaming Circuits, would be too expensive for anything but well-funded big-business and big-education. In reality, that may not at all be the case. Like so many other things in life, there are trade-offs between time, effort, and money. The nice thing about Screaming Circuits is that, unlike the low-cost small volume manufacturers, we can cover both ends of the spectrum.

Our least expensive service is not as cheap as the lowest-cost assemblers. We don’t sell on price, but when you start to add in reality and practicality, the cost difference gets much smaller.

OpenHardware logoIf you need that maximum performance, “I need it now, now, now!” service, there’s no question that you need a premium manufacturer, like Screaming Circuits. But let’s do some compare and contrast on the other end of the spectrum. Can Screaming Circuits be a good deal for a maker?

I’ve got an open source Arduino-compatible robot motor board that I designed a while back. I’ve hand-built a few, because I enjoy soldering, but for this exercise, we’ll pretend I’m a maker with a Kickstarter and I need more built up.

I’ll need 250 for the hypothetical Kickstarter project. The 1.5” x 3.5" board uses an ATMEGA32U4 processor with the Arduino Leonardo bootloader. From a software perspective, it looks just like a Leonardo. It uses a different hardware form-factor than the standard Arduino to better fit a mobile robot.

1-DSC_0001It’s got 26 different components (26 line items in the Bill of Materials). Due to some part types being used in multiple places, that’s a total of 48 surface mount (SMT) placements. I’ll ignore the few thru-hole parts. As a Kickstarter, I would supply the board with all of the SMT parts installed and let the customer solder in the thru-hole parts. That’s pretty common practice in the hobby, maker and Open Source world.

You can quote the assembly on the Screaming Circuits website without registering, so let’s do just that. It’s got:

  • 250 desired board quantity
  • 26 unique parts (BOM line items)
  • SMT on 2 sides? Yes
  • Lead-Free? No (If you’re shipping into Europe, you’ll need lead-free)
  • Class III? No
  • ITAR? No
  • 48 SMT parts
  • 0 thru-hole
  • 0 BGA/QFN

For 20 day, Short-Run production service, this comes out to $9.81 per board - less than $10.00 each.

Soldering by hand, I can do about two an hour. Some folks are faster than me, but some are slower. At two per hour, I’d spend 12 ten-hour days hand soldering the 250 boards. Ouch!

You can most likely find a cheap overseas manufacturer that would build 250 them for less, but they may not want such a small job. You may end up with concerns about intellectual property theft, and you may not get the yields you need.

At Screaming Circuits, we treat every job as proprietary, we’re happy with a run of 250 without any commitments for more, and we promise 100% assembly yield. Finally, a job like this, that totals out to $2,452.48, gets the same process and care as does a $10,000 quick-turn complex prototype.

Food for thought.

Duane Benson
Here's a Kickstarter we built back in 2012