Screaming Circuits: Top-Ten Lists


Top 5 Things to Know When Moving from Hand Assembly to Robotic Assembly

A lot of factors go into the decision to hand build or outsource circuit boards. I hand build my own sometimes, simply because I enjoy the challenge. Of course most of the projects I design are for my own use, so timeliness isn't that important. When I do design something that will go out to a customer, like my electronic business card holder, I will send the board through our shop. In those cases, quality is important, as is delivery, and the quantity is often too high TI TPS62601 front and backto hand build. Machine building also allows me to use smaller and more complex parts.

That same decision - hand build or outsource - takes place in the heads of designers all over the country. When the decision is to outsource, there are a few important things to consider. Some things that work fine when hand soldering may stand in the way of quality, repeatability, and reliability when machine assembling.

Here are five of the most important considerations when changing from hand built to outsourced at a place like Screaming Circuits

1. Use solder mask and silk screen

A good solder joint needs the right amount of solder in the right place. Solder will tend to flow down bare copper, bleeding outside of the area it belongs, and down exposed copper traces and vias.

The main purpose of solder mask is to keep the solder where it belongs. It also protects the traces, but that's a longevity issue. Solder bleeding is a manufacturing and reliability issue. This isn't a problem when hand soldering. In fact, it can even work to your advantage when hand soldering really small parts. It gives you more room for your soldering iron to hit metal.

Not so with solder paste and machine assembly. Use solder mask.

2. Avoid the pseudo panel

Keeping small boards in a panel is the recommended best practice in the manufacturing industry. We appreciate it and, while not always necessary, can reduce your costs. We sometimes see what we call a "pseudo panel." This is a board where multiples of the board are put in the same PCB, like a panel, but unlike a panel, the boards don't have routing or V-score between them. Sometimes the designer will put a bunch of vias to outline the board, or just ask that we use a band saw to separate them.

That's a time consuming, expensive, and potentially damaging process. The vibration of the saw can crack solder joints, and, you're unlikely to get boards that are all the same size. Have small boards panelized by your board house.

3. family panel (pseudo or not)

Similar to the pseudo panel is the family panel. A family panel is a case where a project is made up of several different PC boards, and they are all laid out together, as though they are one design. If the board isn't routed between to designs, you'll have the pseudo panel problem described above.

The bigger problem, though, comes with reference designators. We typically see family panels with duplicate reference designators. Each design, for example, will have its own C1, R1, Q1, etc. We use the reference designators as position identifiers/ If you have three different parts labeled R5, our machine programmers will have a problem with it. It's even worse if the values differ; on one design, C1 is a 0.1uf capacitor, while on another design, it's a 22pf cap.

If you're making a family panel, give each and every placement a different reference designator. One way would be to us extra digits. For example on one design on the family panel could have C100, C101, C102... The next would be C200, C201, C203, and so on.

And - don't forget the routing or V-score between the designs.

4. QFN - hole  in the middle

A common technique in the hand soldering world, for soldering QFNs and other parts with thermal pads underneath is to put a big via in the middle of the center pad. By doing so, you can stick a soldering iron and some solder down through the hole and get a good solder connection on the bottom pad.

This doesn't work with machine assembly. the solder paste will flow down and out the hole in the reflow oven. You'll end up with a poor connection (or no connection) to the thermal pad, and solder slop on the back side of the board.

BOM line items 0055. Parts and the Bill of Materials (BOM)

When I build my hobby projects, I often get a bit carefree with the bill of materials. It's not good practice, but I do. I'll put a part in the BOM that I used before, and not check to see if it's still in stock. I'll put parts in the BOM with just the values and not any part numbers. Things of that sort require tribal knowledge, which only the designer has.

When building, sometimes I'll just grab a part that's close. If I need an 0805 1uf, 10 volt capacitor, I can grab a 16 volt, 25 volt, etc. I can even make an 0603 part work. You as the designer may know that something close will work, but an outside house can't know. You need to tell them exactly what the part is.

Before sending anything through our shop, I do clean up the BOM. In order for us, or any manufacturer, to build the boards, the BOM needs:

  • A unique reference designator for each part placement
  • The quantity of each part used on the board
  • The manufacturer
  • The manufacturer's part number
  • Digikey part numbers can be used as well

Here's our web site page explaining the BOM format in more detail.

The transition from hand building to outsourced machine building can be an intimidating one. But, with a few considerations, it can be an easy and rewarding transition.

Duane Benson
Put the right part in
Put the wrong part out
Put the right part in
But please don't shake it all about

 

Predictions For The End of the Decade

Half a decade ago, back in January 2010, I wrote up a list of predictions for the end of the decade. You can read that list here. It's still 2015, so I can plausibly say that we're half way there, which is a good time for a status update.

0000: In 2010, I said: By the end of the decade, 50% of all passives will be embedded passives and 20% of all PCBs will have 90% or more of their passives embedded.

In 2015, I say: This doesn't look to be coming true, but it still might. As mobile devices and wearables get smaller, or more powerful, more electronics will need to be stuffed in progressively smaller areas. Those passives need to go somewhere. That somewhere could be into the PCB, or into the chips. I think the PCB is more likely.

0001: In 2010, I said:By the end of the decade, Quad stack POP (package on package) will be commonplace.

In 2015, I say: Quite likely. Double layer POP is showing up on low cost devices, like the $5.00 Raspberry Pi Zero. If it can go there, it can go pretty much anywhere. It won't be long before double stacking won't be enough. Although, the layers may end up being inside the chip package, rather than individual chips as layers.

0010: In 2010, I said: By the end of the decade, Each individual human will have their own IP address. Several of us will have more than one. That way, we can jury rig accelerometers into our hands and feet so we can wirelessly know where each of our extremities are at all times. Cats will have them too.

In 2015, I say: Yep, and then some. I already carry one in my pocket. In five years, we'll likely see personally assigned I.P. addresses that won't be device dependent. We'll be able to buy I.P. enabled clothes, like gloves, which will do a lot more than just know where each finger is. The pet ID chips that today, use NFC, will be available in wireless Internet connected versions.

0011: In 2010, I said: By the end of the decade, solder paste will be used less often than not when assembling components on to PCBs.

In 2015, I say: We will be seeing welded copper, additive embedded 3D printing processes, conductive glue, and other non-solder methods of assembly, but nowhere near to the degree I was thinking back in 2010.

0100: In 2010, I said: By the end of the decade, nearly all hydraulics and pneumatics in new motor vehicles will have been replaced by electrics.

In 2015, I say: This is already well on the way. With electric and hybrid electric cars growing in numbers, and with weight and fuel mileage being such a concern, this has to happen.

0101: In 2010, I said: By the end of the decade,the first semi-autonomous passenger vehicle will be on display on the auto-show circuit. Hobbyist built semi-autonomous cars will already be on the road.

In 2015, I say: I may have missed the boat on this prediction, in the pessimistic direction. Part of it has already happened. I haven't yet seen hobby kits, but most of the major car manufacturers have shown models. Tesla has a really good driver assist "auto pilot", and is promising fully autonomous vehicles for sale within two years of this writing.

0110: I said: By the end of the decade, "airline pilot" will generally be a really, really, really boring job. That's a bit of a problem.

In 2015, I say: The necessary level of automation required for this prediction to come true is already installed in most airliners. The only real question remaining, is how long before it changes from "Pilot primary, systems secondary" to "Systems primary, pilot secondary."

0111: In 2010, I said: By the end of the decade, most military "foot action" will consist of two soldiers in command of a squad of robots and those two soldiers will as likely be in Fort Lewis, Washington as in the combat zone.

In 2015, I say: Sadly, I still think this will happen. Not sad that fewer humans will be shooting and getting shot, but sad that we as a species will still consider war important enough to be throwing large quantities of money and resources at.

1000: In 2010, I said: By the end of the decade, the president of the US will be promising health care reform as the highest priority.

In 2015, I say: Yep. The president, presidential hopefuls, senators and representatives will still see this as a hot issue. One side will be trying to make quality healthcare more accessible, the other side less. One side, more publicly funded, the other side, less. I'm not really sure which side will be doing which, but I'm certain that each side will say they want to fix it and the other side wants to destroy it. Ugh.

1001: In 2010, I said: By the end of the decade, routine bioengineering will be, well, routine. Very scary.

In 2015, I say: I'm not so sure about this one. When I wrote it, I was thinking that home bioengineering would be happening and a class of bio-hackers would be emerging. That may still happen, but it won't be common. Governments, agriculture, and medicine will be doing a lot more of this, but I'm not sure the term "routine" will be accurate.

1010: In 2010, I said: By the end of the decade, the 2019 recession will be looming large and all of the people that have forgotten about the 2009 recession and the 2001 recession and the 1985 recession and the 1975 recession... will be freaking out again.

In 2015, I say: Is there any doubt? Does this ever not happen?

1011: In 2010, I said: By the end of the decade, lead will be gone from 98% of new electronics. Bummer.

In 2015, I say: Exemptions are going away. This will happen.

1100: In 2010, I said: By the end of the decade, four of the substances that replaced the substances removed from electronics due to ROHS and similar regulations will have been found to be significantly more harmful to the environment and the people recycling the materials than are the substances that they replaced.

In 2015, I say: I was being tongue-in-cheek, but it still might happen. The only caveat is that if it does happen, the data will be so obscured by politics, that it likely won't be possible for anyone to come to an informed opinion.

1101: In 2010, I said: By the end of the decade, the world of intellectual property will be in even more of a mess than it is today. Virtually everything will be accessibly for easy theft and cheap replication. (this is pretty much a big "duh")

In 2015, I say: This is still well on the way. Any industry that designs things will need to adapt to keep competitive. The patent world will still be a mess. Copyrights will be more of a litigation attack weapon than a protection tool. The best defense against pirates will be faster innovation. On the positive side, a lot of I.P. sharing will be intentional (by the inventor) and many businesses will be built based on collaborative innovation.

1110: In 2010, I said: By the end of the decade,building your own mutli-purpose robot will be as easy as building your own PC was in 1988. Hardware components and operating systems will be off the shelf, but standards will be pretty loosely defined, interoperability will be more theory than reality and applications will be sketchy and buggy.

In 2015, I say: This will happen, but it may be a little later than the end of the decade. The technology will very much exist for this to happen, but the capability of the hardware will probably be advancing so fast that even the limited amount of standardization needed for this won't be possible.

1111: In 2010, I said: By the end of the decade, still no flying cars and personal jet packs, dadgummit!

In 2015, I say: And, still no real hover boards.

Duane Benson

Proper PC board storage - The top three hazards

It's late. Do you know where your PC boards are? Let me rephrase that: Can unused PC boards be stored for future use?

Yes, they can - if stored properly. Keep them wrapped up, or sealed in a bag. Anti-static isn't necessary in this case, but it won't hurt. Keep them in a cool, dark place. Keep them clean. Do your best to avoid dropping them on the floor and stepping on them.

The board in this photo was left out on a desk for a while, and then shoved into a desk drawer. The environment took its toll on the immersion sliver finish, making it very much unusable.

Old Beagleboard

What can go wrong:

#1: Fingerprints: The oils on your finger can etch your fingerprints into ENIG or immersion silver PC board surfaces. If you plan on committing a crime, go ahead and do this so we can catch you. If you aren't going to start a life of crime, be careful to not get your fingerprints on the board surface. Handle on the edges, or at least, don't touch any exposed metal.

#2: Moisture: Moisture is good for your skin, but not for your PC boards. Over time, PCBs can absorb moisture, especially in a humid location, or the ocean. If thrown into a reflow oven, they then might laminate. Do your best to store boards in a dry environment. If stored for a long time, you may want to pre-bake them prior to use.

#3: Atmosphere: Sometimes dirty air can contribute to tarnish or corrosion on the exposed land pads. Dust can settle onto the boards as well. Tarnish and dust can usually be cleaned off, but corrosion can't. Wrap up your boards for long-term storage.

Treat your boards well and you can likely use them at a later date. Don't treat them well and you may need to replace them, wasting a bunch of money. Often, the damage isn't as clear as in the above photo, but could still lead to poor solderability.

Duane Benson
Don't surf on your silver

The Past and Future of Electronics

Our parent company, Milwaukee Electronics was founded 60 years ago, in 1954. That's quite a long time in terms of electronics.

  • 60 years back

1954 was a big year for transistor electronics. The first commercially produced transistor radio, the Regency TR-1, was put on sale in November 1954, for a price of $49.95. The Bell Labs TRADIC, the first transistorized computer in the U.S. showed up in 1954.

TiconIt was also a big year for nuclear energy. The first civilian nuclear power plant went on line in Russia (whether it was a military research facility or a power generation facility is under debate). The European CERN nuclear research organization was formed.

The first atomic powered submarine, The Nautilus, was commissioned by the U.S. Navy. 1954 also saw the U.S. explode the first hydrogen bomb. The Atomic Energy Act of 1954 paved the way for the civilian use of atomic power in the U.S.

The magazine Popular Electronics debuted in October 1954. That issue covered, amongst other things, a solar "battery" with 6% efficiency, radio control of models, and capacitors.

That was a bit of the past. What will the future of electronics hold? What will technology look like in 2074? Will the world even be recognisable at all?

  • 60 years forward

Well, hopefully, there won't be any new developments in the area of bigger and more powerful bombs, like in 1954. Hopefully, we won't have been enslaved by our new robot overlords. Regardless, electronics will be vastly different in 2074.

The concept of a printed circuits board will have long passed by that year. Electronics will be more of a construction material supplement.

Processing power and sensors will come in a bag, in the form of tiny particles. They'll self-power with energy harvesting. They'll have integrated wireless communications. Each one, won't do much, but when added together, they will essentially form a big piece of programmable logic.

Take aircraft paint as an example. The paint manufacturers will mix in intelligent "dust." The aircraft paint will get a ratio or 40% computational dust, 10% strain gauge dust, 20% rf/temperature/light/moisture sensor dust, 20% actuator dust, and 10% other miscellaneous functionality dust.

Once applied to the aircraft, the paint will manifest itself as a giant programmable logic and sensor array. The paint will cover communications, location and all forms of sensing and maneuvering.

The smart dust will be mixed up in different proportions, based on the application requirements, and added to everything. Even food.

Duane Benson
I think that pill will be ready long before the year 3535

Geek Week on Youtube

In case you haven't heard, it's Geek Week on Youtube. In honor of that, here are the top ten most incredible pieces of trivia from ancient Geek Mythology. You can scroll down and read them here, or have the questions read to you, by me, over on our Youtube channel. 

 

First question:

F: Everyone has heard the trite phrase: “There are 10 types of people; those who understand binary and those who don’t.” Who’s missing?

E: All your _____ are belong to us. Fill in the blank.

D: Who, in the late ‘70s correctly predicted that by the turn of the century, it would be possible to use our computers to find the answer to any question?

C: And, what name did he give his computer?

 B: Bell is reputed to have said: “Watson, come here. I need you.” What was Charlie Klien’s equivalent statement in 1969?

A: Who caused the “Y2K” problem? And, no, that’s not it. You’re already wrong.

9: Who did business under the name “Traf-O-Data”, starting in 1971?

8: One particular semi-nautically named person wrote the first word processor for the Apple II while in prison. Who was that?

7: And, what was that word processor? Bonus points if you’ve actually used it.

6: Who, in 1995, while on his deathbed, claimed to be DB Cooper? Bonus points if you know why I might know this.

5: How many tubes did a standard superhetrodyne radio have?

4: Name them.

3: When did the first man go into space? Be advised that you’re probably wrong.

2: When someone refers to “scout water”, what are they referring to?

1:  How many instructions did the first CPU have?

Now, drum roll please… ,

0: What is the least known, yet probably the most significant law that enabled the personal computer revolution to happen?

And... This is a contest. The first five people, in North America, to get the correct answers will receive a T-Shirt from us - or the five closest to complete and correct. You have until next Monday (8-12-13), when we post the answers. If you choose to submit answers, send them to dbenson @ screamingcircuits . com with the subject line "Trivia answers"

Duane Benson
According the The Buggles, video killed the radio star
If so, then why do we still have radio telescopes? 

10th Anniversary Top 10 Traps

A few folks requested my presentation from out 10th anniversary open house.So, without much adieu, here it is.

Download Top 10 traps 7-2013 (PowerPoint format)

Download Top 10 traps 7-2013 (PDF format)

Duane Benson
10 times 10 isn't necessarily equal to 10 times 10.
Especially if you mix bases.

Top Ten Things To Do In 2012

Mayan_glyphUnless you've managed to live off the grid for the last five years, you know that the Mayan calendar has predicted the end of the world on December 21, 2012. Ignoring all conventional wisdom, centuries of scientific knowledge and the fact that the Mayan community doesn't even believe it, I feel compelled to list key electronics things that everyone should see or do in this last year before the end of the world. Because, you know, just in case...

Here are the top ten things to look into or do in 2012 before the end of the world on December 21, 2012:

0b0000.0000: Build something open source. It's amazing what is available. Back in the heyday of hobby electronics, it was easy to find projects in magazines such as "Popular Electronics." You could get kits from Heathkit or RadioShack. But, for the most part, all of those things went away. With Open Source, you can build an almost unlimited variety of gadgets. What's more, you can taylor your build to your experience level. If you want to do it all, just get the files, fab your boards, buy your parts and solder it up. If you're less ambitious, buy a complete kit. If you're even more ambitious, mod the design and post it up for the community.

0b0000.0001: While you're out fiddling with Open Source, get ahold of a Beaglebone. It's Ti's second take on open source hardware. The original Beaglebard was and is a great way to get to know their OMAP processors, both in therms of programming it and in terms of designing a PCB for it. The Beaglebone is an easier to use, easier to expand, but not quite as powerful adjunct to the Beagleboard.

0b0000.0010: Try out some new CAD software. Sunstone released PCB123 version 4 in 2011 and Element14 released EagleCAD version 6. Check them out and see if they do what you need. Both are good economical ways to get into circuit design and layout. PCB123 doesn't cost anything initially. It sends your boards through Sunstone and they earn their rent that way. Eagle has a tiered pricing model, starting at a small non-commercial version for free and stepping up to a full-feature professional system.

0b0000.0011: Try out some newer technology. I'f you've always been intimidated by QFN or micro BGA packages, go ahead and give it a try. They're more difficult at first, but once you've got the tricks down, you get access to a slew of new components that only come out in those form factors. Check out some guidelines on QFN use.

0b0000.0100: Look at space pictures. There are a number of probes up running around our solar system these days, and one on the verge of leaving it. Hop on over the nasa.gov or space.com and see what's going on. There's a probe orbiting an asteroid, new ones off to Jupiter and Mars, one orbiting Mercury, some new space telescopes and more. There's just a lot going on out there right now. You can even leave your computer, go outside and look up at the sky for real.

0b0000.0101: Try and make something really, really small. For my part, I'm taking a little two-motor robot brain I've built and an trying to see just how small I can make it. You have to think differently when size is a prime consideration. Factors that didn't matter much suddenly become design critical. It might be an opportunity to freshen your brain up a bit (although, if the world is ending on 12-21-12, having a fresh brain may not be all that important).

0b0000.0110: Go back in time. Get a 2N2222 or 2N3907, or both. See if you remember how to build basic common base, common emitter and common collector amplifiers. No. Don't go to Wikipedia. Try to do it from memory. I'm sure you built all of them waaaay back in your school days. Next try to build some basic logic gates with transistors. After you've done that, see if you can build up a RSIC processor and a 512 Mbyte RAM block using only discrete transistors and passives. As your final assignment, use the computer system you built to calculate the first 100,000 prime numbers.

0b0000.0111: Take your most recent resume and replace all of the letters, spaces, tabs and line ends with their hex values. Submit it in that form for your dream job. Then sit back and wait for the hiring manager to bow down to your superior skills. Since the world is ending, it really won't matter that the first person to see the resume thought it was gibberish and round-filed it.

0b0000.1000: Introduce your kids (if you have them) to robots. Get them started down the technical path early; both boys and girls. And, if you have daughters, make sure they don't get discouraged by peer pressure or whatever pressure. If they are interested in a technical career, don't let the world around them pressure them out of it. If you don't have kids, build some robots yourself and introduce your pets to them. See who ends up chasing whom around the house.

0b0000.1001: Finally, ignore all of this. Come on. Really? The Mayans knew when the world would end? Even I don't know that. Although, there was that John Cusack movie. And I've read about it on the Internet and everyone knows that if you read it on the Internet, it must be true...

Duane Benson
See you all on the other side

Top-Ten Ways to Use The Summer to Your Advantage

Now, we're talking in an engineering context here. There certainly are plenty of ways to use the summer to your advantage if you like to water ski or go backpacking, but this is a specific list. Here are my top-ten suggested ways to use the summer to your advantage as an electronics designer:

Eurpoa car#Europa - Work longer. You can spend an extra few hours with you friend the Oscilloscope fighting the demons of clock jitter. With the longer days in the summer, you can do so and still get home just before sunset, as everyone else in the family is ending their relaxing evening and getting ready for bed.

#Luna - Be Green. All of those extra photons bouncing around during the summer will help to keep your solar panels producing at high-output. If only you had thirty years of continuous summer, you could pay for them before they wear out. If you live in Oregon, you'd probably need sixty years because even our summers can be pretty cloudy and rainy.

#Io - Debug thermal problems. Especially if you don't have working air conditioning. Late afternoon, the ambient in your lab will have raised up to at least 90. With the stifling lack of air movement, now is the time to turn on the high powered design that seemed to work just fine when you first prototyped it over the winter, but burps at seeming random intervals when used in the field, down in West Texas.

#Callisto - Increase your workspace. It's hot. It's clear. And, the open road beckons you. Get out your bicycle and pedal the 20 miles from home into the office. You'll be adding to #Luna, and if you don't take a shower when you arrive at the office, you'll be given plenty of extra lab workbench area.

#Mercury - Help marketing out with some product specs. Say you've developed a short-range wireless device. You know how well it works in a real world application. You've been testing it in the lab for several months now. You know how much things like walls and microwave ovens will reduce the practical range. But, it rained all winter and spring so you couldn't go outside and get the absolutely-will-never-happen-in-the-real-world range specs that will go on the brochure and be used to entice and mislead potential customers.

#Titan - Blow some stuff up. Not in the Mythbusters sense, but taking a cue from #Io, you can forget to plug in the cooling fan on your deck of MOSFETs in that new H-bridge you've been working on. Crank the PWM up to about 95% and they seem to be handling things okay - at least from the outside view. Then, with the confidence built from that exercise, put a heavy load on the motor and set the PWM at 20%. It's not gun shots. It's not popcorn. It's exploding MOSFETs!

#Ganymede - Waste some time. This works best if you have a window view. You've got a lot to do. You're overworked, underpaid and not given the help you need to get your job done on time. Rather than stressing out of all of that, arrange your cube so that no one walking by can see you monitor, but you have a clear view out the window. Then sit back in your chair, stare past your monitor, out the window and daydream about golf and barbecuing. People will think you're pondering solutions to design problems.

#Mars - Get more glory. All of your co-workers have been ahead of you throughout the winter. They've finished their projects and get to take vacation while you slave away back at the office. While they're out, fake problems in their designs and then fake the solutions. They'll all get reprimanded when they return and you'll be the star of the department. At least you will until the next design review when your boss wants to know why your design is only half finished despite how busy you've been all summer.

#Venus - Slip out an actual working product. This is the complement to #Mars for people who are actually good at their jobs. Normally, you'd be under artificially created pressure to release the project before it's quite ready. There's some press tour or show or something else that everyone wants it done before. You mess with the company vacation calendar so that the people who want to show it off are never in the office at the same time. That way you'll be able to ge that extra couple of weeks you need and should have been given to make sure the thing works right the first time and every time.

#Earth - And, drum roll please, the anti-climactic #Earth way you can use summer to your advantage: Clear your head. It's been a long, rough year, with downsizing, parts on allocation, competitive pressures and a host of other factors that have put you on the fast track to breakdown. Schedule yourself some vacation time. Leave all that junk behind and take your mountain bike to Moab or something. Just don't take a sharp left when you're on the "Killer B" trail.

Duane Benson
Don't look! Heisenberg may have been right.

Top-Five Ways April Fools Is Good For You

PBGA 1April first isn't quite here yet, unless you're reading this a month from now. Then it's long come and gone. The concept of "April Fools" goes back many years. In some circles, the first April Fools Joke is said to have been played on November 13th in the year 1959 by Duchess Gloriana XII of Grand Fenwick. Others pin the first joke several centuries earlier.

Conventional thinking is that the jokes played on that day can be humorous, annoying, disruptive or downright dangerous. It's the disruptive and dangerous jokes that have caused the formation of a movement to ban all jokes on April first. Despite that, history has shown that the levity of the day can have positive effects as well. That being the case, here are my top-five reasons that April Fool's Day can be good for you:

  1. It can be good for your peace of mind. If your co-worker plays a joke on you by secretly changing the calibration on your scope so the ranges will be off, you can have a day of feeling good about your OP Amp circuit, thinking the noise level is down to just where you want it.
  2. April Fools jokes can lower your blood pressure. For example, say a co-worker replaces your pepper with a bunch of 1mm x 1.3mm 6 bump chip scale BGAs. You then put generous helpings of salt and "pepper" on your chicken sandwich. While probably not at all healthy, the little chips probably aren't fatally bad to consume but would taste bad so you'd spit the first bite out and not eat the rest of your sandwich, thus not consuming all of that blood-pressure-raising salt.
  3. It can make solder selection easier. As it is, your lead-free vs. leaded decision (for stuff not going to Europe) has to be made based on the BGA. Mixing leaded solder with lead-free BGAs and vice verse is not a good thing. If someone in materials plays an April Fool's joke on you by scraping all of the solder balls off of your BGA, you may at first feel despair. But then you realize that without the pesky solder balls, you can use it like an LGA and pick whatever kind of solder you want.
  4. It can help with recreation. When you arrive to your cubicle loaded with 20,000 ping pong balls, you may be dismayed at first. But, take heart in the fact that you now have a lifetime supply of ping pong balls. You can now learn the sport without fear of losing your supply of ping pong balls due to explosion or crushing. And, be glad that they didn't used golf balls.
  5. You can get a promotion and a big raise. This is your opportunity to shine. Play a humiliating and very public prank on your boss, or perhaps your boss's boss. By bringing humor into his or her life, you'll not only be noticed, but will also be greatly appreciated for raising moral though public humiliation of management. They always appreciate that.

Duane Benson
Ever get that sinking feeling - you had a very tiny part out so you could use the part number in a humor blog post referring to consuming that part and when you're about halfway through the snack you've been eating while writing the post, you discover that the tiny little part is gone? At least it's a lead-free part.

Open Source Mea Culpa or back pedaling? You decide

Last week I wrote about "Ten electronics things to be thankful for in 2010." If you're reading this now, you probably don't need the link because you probably read that article then too. But that's not really relevant. What is relevant is that in my #6, about open source hardware. I wrote, in part, that in some ways open source seems a bit exploitative of the designers. pt wrote in the comments for the blog article asking if I could give an example of how open source is exploitative.

I got to thinking about my choice of words and came to the conclusion that "exploitive" doesn't quite cover what I was trying to say. Although, in some cases, I think it does. It's possible that there are some aspects of the open source movement that I just don't get. Or it's possible that I have the capacity to pick a black cloud out of anything. If that's the case, I like to think that I can also pick a silver lining out of anything as well. That combination becomes a problem with recursion.

I'm a capitalist so I believe that (a) it's important to have profit as an ultimate goal of any commercial endeavor. I still have a bit of idealism left so I also believe that (b) when making that profit, we should be like the Boy Scouts and leave the planet a little better off than we found it. I get sick to my stomach when I read about executives making massive millions of dollars when their employees struggle to adequately feed and clothe their kids. (Is this post turning into one of those "I believe..." manifestos?) Following up that last point, I believe that (c) if someone does good work, they should get something in return for it. It's a trade. You give me something valuable and I'll give you something valuable in return. Not always money, but something of value.

That's where the mushiness comes in for me. Here's the good side. Ti is a big company that, with the Beagleboard, is giving something of great value to the electronics design community. As far as I know, the people at Ti working on the project are paid. My guess is that the ultimate motivation of Ti is it to help sell chips, but the project has given a whole lot of people access to a level of performance whom would not have had access it otherwise. That endeavor meets my abc conditions. Companies like Adafruit, Sparkfun and DIYdrones have built successful small (and growing) businesses with the help of open source hardware and software. People are making a living (I assume) from those organizations. Both companies give a lot back to the community and both companies make it very clear that they benefit from and really appreciate the efforts of open source designers. They give the folks recognition and support. They and companies like them meet my abc.

The other side of open source, and where I smell the exploitation, is when big companies use open source, make large profits and don't return anything. I mean, sure, the licence allows them to and I suppose that by reducing their costs, they can be more competitive and stay in business, keeping their employees employed. But when a software company buys the remains of another company or two that allegedly "own" some opensource code and then tries to make a business of suing people that use that open source software; I consider that to pretty exploitive of all of the people that voluntarily gave their time to the project.

When a large muti-national company that sells server farms uses an open source OS and doesn't return anything to the designers, I find that also to be exploitive. I don't know what the answer is. I mean it's cool that Linux, for example, is used in so many places. The fact that big corporations put so much weight on it certainly validates the legitimacy of it. But I can't help but envision open source developers out there, that could really use a bit more money in the bank, looking at those big corporations that are profiting off of their backs, feeling a little used.

So, am I missing something? Do I not get it?

By the way, this piece has a lot of personal opinion in it, but I do believe that my company works hard to meets my abc so I don't have a problem posting this on my work blog. The two times in my career that I did work for companies not meeting my abc, both ended badly for me. Fortunately, I believe in this one.

So, help me out here. If I'm not getting a part of this, feel free to chime in.

Duane "Does idealism hold up in the face of reality?" Benson