Corporate Cats

Here at Screaming CIrcuits, we're all busy making sure to get everyone's assembly orders shipped off on time so here's a picture of one of our corporate kitty cats.

COrporate kitty

We have a pair that live on campus here. They seem to be quite content to buzz about the parking lot and surrounding hedges all day while we build things. That's for the best because we do keep them off our production floor. Cats can cause static electricity and that would be bad.

Duane Benson
Make sure the dip with your chips is lead free before eating it

VLV - Very Large Vias

I recently received a question over on Twitter. Tomaž Šolc, AKA avian2 asked:

"@pcbassembly What is your opinion on the "one big plated drill in QFN ground pad" pattern? pic.twitter.com/M9ZLftpuo0"

From Avian2 Ban_N62IEAAm3acI answered back: "Bad for machine assembly, okay for hand assembly." That's definitely true, but it's worthy of a bit more explanation. Here's the photo avian2 included along with the question. We're looking at the side opposite of where the QFNs are mounted. The two big openings in the square gold pads are the big vias (plated drill).

This is often done when hand soldering QFNs. Somehow you get the little pins on the outside edge of the QFN soldered down. Then you turn the board over and poke your soldering iron into the big opening to solder the pad down.

Generally, there wouldn't be any reason to do this with machine assembly, as we do here in our plant. You put a number of small vias, cap them, and segment the solder paste layer (refer to this post and this post). Thus, we would never recommend using big vias like this for machine assembly.

However, I can envision some situations that might call for this. First, there's the hand solder method I mentioned above. Next, there may be some very specific need to expose a lot of the pad to open air for cooling. In general, this is not the best way to get cooling, but maybe in some special case. Third, perhaps you need access to the pad as a test point and don't have enough room to get access any other way.

You wouldn't do any of those three things in a production environment, but in a prototype world, sometimes things happen differently.

Duane Benson
Hurray! Only one day until Mitten Tree Day!

Surface Mount, But Not Really

Sometimes parts labeled as surface mount aren't quite ready for prime time. I've written about this subject before (read here), and I'm going to write about it again - whether you like it or not. This time, however, I'm not talking about components that aren't up to thermal par. Today, it's about components that can take the heat, but aren't set up to be machine assembled.

Surface mount machines need a flat surface to pick on. They use small vacuum nozzles that need to seat on that flat spot. Chips, of course, are flat on top, as are most other components. Connectors, however, are often not flat on top. That doesn't leave any place for the "pick and place" machine to pick.

Single row header with pick and place padGenerally, manufacturers will place a small tab of Kapton® tape or a small snap-in plastic pad on top of the connector, giving the machine a surface to work with. You can see that in the photo on the left. Once the board has been fully assembled, the tape or plastic pad is simply removed.

Every now and then, we'll see connectors come in without that flat pick and place surface (like on the right). That means the machine can't place it, so it will have to be placed by hand. 1.25mm-Wafer-SMT-Connector

When buying your surface mount connectors, if you have a choice between a part with the tape and one without, you're better off picking the one with the tape. No offence intended to all of you humans, but machine assembly is generally preferred over human assembly.

Duane Benson
Only three more days until Mitten Tree Day!

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