Designing The Future: The Automobile

Here's a small glimpse into the future of the automobile. Granted,these guys had to take the dash off and hard wire in, but imagine this with a not-secure-enough wireless access.

 

Duane Benson
And... some of us here are helping to make this happen...

10th Anniversary Top 10 Traps

A few folks requested my presentation from out 10th anniversary open house.So, without much adieu, here it is.

Download Top 10 traps 7-2013 (PowerPoint format)

Download Top 10 traps 7-2013 (PDF format)

Duane Benson
10 times 10 isn't necessarily equal to 10 times 10.
Especially if you mix bases.

Super Small Via In Pad

Via in pad is an old issue that still pops up now and then. Our standard answer hasn't changed: No open vias in pads. But one of the questions we get related to the subject is: "What if we make the vias really small?"

Beagleboard U6 viasLogically, that makes sense. In fact, in some cases, the via is so small that it's essentially closed. If it's so small that it really is closed, then it's not an open via. But look close - if it's closed with solder, that solder may melt during reflow leading to an open via.

The images here show some pretty small vias. I believe they're 0.3 mm in diameter.

Beagleboard vias back sideIn the first picture, on the left, it appears that the vias are open. They aren't though. This board (an unstuffed Beagleboard) uses soldermask on the back side of the PCB to close off the vias, as shown in the image on the right.

Our recommended method (se more detail here and here) is to plug the via with copper or epoxy and have it plated over at the board fab house. Next, we'd recommend via caps on the component side. FInally, capping the back side with soldermask, like this example can work, but it comes with the risk of voids. The via caps and also pop open, leading to an open via.

Duane Benson
No more open vias-in-pad, I mean it!
Anybody want a peanit?

CAD Data Files

I've spent a fair amount of time researching and writing about the centroid file and about CAD library footprints. One of the challenges in this industry is that somethings that are "standard" really aren't all that standard. That's why we emphasize following IPC guidelines when creating library components.

Well, a few things have changed since we started doing this a decade ago. For one, some of the enhanced manufacturing file formats (as opposed to the 1970's vintage Gerber format) have become more prevelent. Those new formats are a very good thing.

Most CAD packages can now output either ASCII formatted CAD data or ODB++ format data. Those file formats have all of the data that would otherwise be found in the centroid and Gerber files. They also have more accurate data. If you can get one of those formats out, go ahead and send it to us. We can also take plain old Eagle CAD .brd files. If in doubt send one of these newer files along with the centroid and Gerbers. We'll use the file with the best data and, we may be able to simplify the file preparation Centroid snippet rot optyou have to do with future jobs.

And speaking of the Centroid, don't worry so much about the rotation column in the Centroid file. You can consider rotation to be optional now. You don't need to check the rotation, nor do you need to remove it.

Duane Benson
Who will win? Godzilla or Centroid? Maybe the Smog Monster?

 

« June 2013 | Main | August 2013 »